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      News — Training

      Is Your Dog Ready To Travel When Disaster Strikes?

      Pet, Is Your Dog Ready To Travel When Disaster Strikes?

      This post was previously published by Kathryn Durno on 4Knines blog.

      Is Your Dog Ready to Travel When Disaster Strikes?

      It has been a crazy summer of devastating hurricanes, flooding, fires and other disasters. Is your dog prepared to weather the storm?

      Is Your Dog Ready to Travel When Disaster Strikes?


       

      We just spent a week on the road with our three dogs after being evacuated for Hurricane Irma. It was extremely stressful and full of anxiety for us and our dogs. I felt prepared and ready to keep my dogs as calm as possible under the circumstances. Sadly, as we crawled down the highway in bumper to bumper traffic, it became clear that many dog owners were just not prepared to travel in an emergency with their dog.

      There are a lot of logistics to consider when you take a road trip with your dog that involves long distance and overnight stays. Throw in a mandatory evacuation or other emergency and the stress that both you and your dog experience can go way up.

      Here are my best tips for having your dog travel ready (emergency or not):

      Keep a Bag Packed and Ready

      Can your dog do this?

      Seeing is believing...Do you need special equipment to get your dog in shape?  No...but it is really fun and can take your dog's fitness to the next level.  Here is  Biddy doing the same exercises we talked about in the last post, but up on her peanut.  The uneven surface gives her an incredible work out and she learns how to focus and balance.  Much the same way a human would use a balance disc or a bosu. So what you can see is as she starts to tire she doesn't fully get back into a stand or she sits down.  Here back legs are getting tired and she is working hard on those core muscles.  You can't really see it, but as she fatigues she will start to shake a little.  Keep in mind...this isn't her first day on this so she has worked up to this level.  My biggest fear ever for my dogs is that as they age they will "get down in the rear" or get injured competing in sports.  Having a strong rear and core is so important for your dog...especially as they get older. There are lots of good instructional videos out there if you decide to get fitness equipment for your dog.  The key is to remember to take it slow...it is just like a human, if you go all out at the gym for the first time in months, you won't want to go back very often!  Most of the equipment you buy will come with an instructional DVD - use it!!!  It will show you how to properly use the equipment and work your dog up to regular use and more challenging exercises. As you can tell from the video - my husband isn't too thrilled about making the video...but there is a line of dogs on the other side of the door anxiously waiting for their turn on the peanut!!!   [embed]https://youtu.be/4gd0mCm1fF8[/embed]

      Fido Fitness - It all starts with core strength

      It all starts with core strength.  Just like humans, dogs need to have a strong core.  Does your dog look good but not great?  Is your dog at the right weight, but just doesn't look fit?   Take a good look at your dog as he moves around the ring or around the yard.  Do you see a shift or roll on his back?  If you notice any of these things, your dog needs to strengthen his core.  

      Here are three easy exercises you can do in just a few minuets, without special equipment, to improve your dogs core strength.  In addition to improved appearance and performance, a strong core will reduce the risk of injury, improve gait and will literally carry your dog in their senior years. Here are three quick and easy exercises you can do with your dog on a daily basis that will improve core strength.  No special equipment is needed and you can run your dog through these in just a few minutes time.  I take my three dogs through them while I drink my coffee each morning.

      • Sit to Stand reps.  This is an easy one, since most dogs already know how to sit.  Ask your dog to Sit, then Stand, Sit then Stand.  I have worked my dogs up to 3 sets of 10 repetitions each.  The pace is about 1 second between Sit and Stand, then a little break before I start the next set.  Make sure your dog is moving to the standing position using their rear, not their front.  If needed, back your  dog's rear into a corner or wall to ensure proper form.  This is harder than you think for your dog.  Start slowly with just a few repetitions and build up over a period of a few weeks.  This is the equivalent of you going to the gym for the first time in months and lifting a lot of weights.  The next day is not a good one...your dog will experience the same thing, so go slowly and make this fun.
      • Sit to Down reps.  Otherwise known as "puppy push-ups".  Put your dog in a Sit, then ask for a Down, then back up into a Sit.  Work your dog up to 3 sets of 10 with about 1 second between the Sit and the Down.  Remember, go slow and gradually increase the number of repetitions that you do.
      • Sit, sit pretty, stand and sit.  This is the hardest but probably the most beneficial of the exercises.  Put your dog in a Sit, the raise up to a what I call a "Sit Pretty" (or the begging dog pose!), then all the way up to standing on two hind legs, then back down to a sit.  Start with your dog in a Sit and just try to move him up to a sit pretty position, the classic standing on haunches with front paws at his chest. For some dogs this is a very natural position that they perform nightly right around dinner time!  But for a lot of dogs this can be very challenging.  Use treats and help your dog up into a sit pretty.  Support him with one hand on his collar and your forearm under his front paws.   Just work and practice up to this position until your dog has mastered it.  A few times each morning for about a week or so and your dog will be comfortable going to this point.  Next add the all the way up on hind legs command and back down.  Once your dog has mastered the positions you can gradually add more repetitions.

      TIPS   Use a clicker when you first start if your dog is not solid on the commands.  Marking the correct position and behavior makes it very clear to your dog what you are asking him to do. If your dog isn't solid on the commands Sit, Stand, Down or Sit Pretty (some people use "up") use a treat at their nose to lure them into the correct position along with a clicker.  For Sit, hold the treat over your dog's nose and move backwards, ultimately, their rear will hit the floor - it is at that exact moment that you click, then offer your reward.  I use both hand signals and the voice commands with my dogs.  If you are just starting, sometimes just the hand signal and lure with the click is best. 

      Once they understand the behavior, then you can add naming the behavior.  Ultimately, they will understand both and using hand signals or voice commands will be interchangeable.  Once they have mastered the commands try one day just using hand signals, the next voice commands...you will be amazed how smart your dog is and how willing they are to work!! What is your dog's favorite reward?  For some dogs it is treats, for others toys or tugging.  Mix it up and find out what your dog likes! Feed a portion of your dogs morning meal as training "treats"  or use healthy, nutritious treats when practicing these exercises.  This becomes a fun game for your dog and you aren't adding extra calories or junk food. Keep it fun!  My dogs LOVE this one on one time and they LOVE to work!   A version of this article was previously posted on Dog Mamma's